Summer Games


Countries wishing to host the Summer Olympic Games or the Winter Olympic Games compete aggressively to have their bid accepted by the IOC. The IOC members, representing most of the member countries, vote to decide where the Games will take place. Members from countries which have cities bidding to host the games are excluded from the voting process, up until the point where their city drops out of the contest. In recent years, the contest for the right to host the games has grown increasingly fierce and controversial. Allegations were leveled after the 1996 Olympics that Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) organizers bribed members of the IOC to obtain the Olympic Games. However, ACOG documents were destroyed prior to a formal inquiry and the allegations remain unproven. In his defense, ACOG Chairman Billy Payne said "Atlanta's bidding effort included excessive actions, even thought processes, that today seem inappropriate but, at the time, reflected the prevailing practices in the selection process and an extremely competitive environment". In 2002, Salt Lake City was involved in a bribery scandal but earlier stories, reported by British journalists Vyv Simson and Andrew Jennings.[22] Corruption in the IOC has been documented by numerous investigations. After the Salt Lake City scandal in which a number of IOC members were expelled following an extensive investigation, efforts were made to clamp down on abuses of the bid city process. More stringent rules were introduced and an advisory board of recently retired former athletes was set up. Critics of the organization believe more fundamental reform is required, for instance replacing the self-perpetuating system of delegate selection with a more democratic process. Even legal attempts to sway the IOC to accept a city's bid can spark controversy, such as Beijing's successful bid to host the 2008 Summer Olympics. Several human rights organizations spoke out against the poor human rights condition of Chin , in conflict with the Olympic Charter of the IOC.[23] In an August 2007 interview on the Beijing 2008 website, IOC President Jacques Rogge said, the IOC "definitely would love to see the continents that have not yet organized the Games like Africa or Latin America do that in the future. I cannot tell you exactly when, but I will see it in my life... We believe in the near future we can determine the host country under this rotating system. As of now, we haven't set a timetable for starting this system".[24] Rogge also said that he would like the IOC to give chance for the games to be held in Third World nations like Haiti, Cambodia, and Cameroon within 2020 and beyond. Andrew Jennings is a Scottish investigative reporter. He is best known for his work investigating and writing about corruption in the IOC and FIFA. Jennings was born in Scotland and as a child moved to London, England. He is the grandson of a former Clapton Orient player.[1] Jennings attended University of Hull[3] and later worked for the Sunday Times' Insight team in the late 1960s, after which he worked for other British newspapers before becoming an investigative reporter on BBC Radio Four's Checkpoint. In 1986 the BBC refused to broadcast his documentary concerning corruption in Scotland Yard; Jennings reacted by resigning and transforming the material into his first book, Scotland Yard's Cocaine Connection, and the documentary was aired by World In Action. Jennings subsequently worked for Granada, filming several international investigations and small documentaries. His investigation of British involvement in the Iran-Contra affair won the gold medal at the 1989 New York TV Festival. In 1993 Jennings entered Chechnya with the first western TV crew ever to enter the country, to investigate Caucasus mafia activity. 1997 saw Jennings working with World In Action, with an investigation on British Olympic swimming coach Hamilton Bland, and in 1998 he presented a documentary on rail privatisation.